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For me, asparagus is synonymous with spring, and more specifically, Easter. It’s one of those vegetables I really didn’t discover until I was in my twenties, and then wondered where I had been the last two decades. I love it, and even more so when it’s roasted.

Before I get to the asparagus, though, here’s my next video blog entry (you can find the first one here), where I talk more about The China Study and tell you why I want to lost that last 15.

Thanks for watching that, and if you have anything else you want to ask, just let me know!

Now, back to the asparagus.

Let me give you a quick rundown as to why it’s a power food.

Asparagus is a great source of Vitamin B6, Magnesium, Zinc, and Calcium. I love it for its fiber, Protein, and long list of vitamins like A, C, E, and K. It also has Folate, Phosphorus, and Potassium, among other things.

With all its benefits, it’s too bad the perfect season for asparagus only lasts so long, but lucky for us, that happens to be right now.

When you choose asparagus, look for spears that are fat, with tight, smooth leaves on the top. Don’t pick the bunches that look like they’re starting to turn to seed or starting to flower. Skinny, spindly asparagus are not the best either, but if they’re all you can find, don’t stress.

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roasted asparagus

2 bunches of asparagus, washed
1-2 tablespoons olive oil
pinch of kosher salt
pinch of freshly ground black pepper

1. Preheat oven to 400ºF. Break the light colored ends off each stalk of asparagus—simply bend each spear, and it will break naturally in the best spot. Place spears on a baking sheet and toss with olive oil and salt and pepper, making sure the leaves are well-coated.

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2. Bake for 15-20 minutes, and remove from oven when spears are darker in color and slightly shriveled. Serve warm or at room temperature.

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